Recruiter Potluck

Do you work in an office setting with others? You probably have had a Potluck, where your co-workers would bring different food items for everyone to eat. Some are good at making desserts, others a main dish, and still others preferred to bring the plates, cups, napkins, and drinks. Everyone is good at something and that is what they chose to share with everyone else.

Recruiting can be the same way. I learned how to be a Recruiter by the “Potluck Method”. When I started, I worked a full desk. Not only did I have to find the candidates, but I had to find the jobs to place them at. I worked around 8-12 other Recruiters who were also working a full desk. Some of the recruiters were new and some had been in the industry for over 20+ years. I started to identify the better Recruiters from the average Recruiters. What made them stand out? What were they good at? What was Recruiter 1 better at and what was Recruiter 2 better at?

Recruiter 1 was very good at getting to know her candidates. What made them tick, what were they really looking for in a new position? She was a great listener and knew how to ask the right questions. How did she do that? She had a knack for making them feel at ease and at home – but how?

Recruiter 2 on the other hand was good at interview prep. When his candidate received an interview, they were prepped and ready to win the interview to get the job. He spent a lot of time walking them through expectations and the overall interview process. But what did he say? What was he really sharing with them?

Recruiter 3 was incredible at cold calling and getting new business. It seemed like every call she made she was picking up new business with a new company. She always knew what to say.

Finding out who is best at different aspects of your role and learning from them is critical. Personally, I stand up and go sit at the person’s desk, sometimes for just 10 minutes and sometimes for an hour however, I would listen intently on what they said and how they said it. What are they doing, and how are they doing it? Most Recruiters are really good at 1 or 2 things and if you can learn from the best and successfully adopt these traits you will be a great Recruiter.

My point is not everyone is an expert at everything. As a Recruiter, I look at my desk and my work and constantly look to learn from those around me. Maybe I have gotten into a rut and my interviews have not been getting hired. Then go back to the basics – learn from your peers. How are they doing interview prep? Recruiting has evolved and has changed; we need to evolve with it. But don’t forget the basics. Pick what you can from the experts/co-workers and make it your own.

Recruiters: New Boolean Sourcing Tool – Recruitin

I was recently told about a new tool – Recruitin.    I was told it let you X-ray LinkedIn, by creating the boolean for you, so I figured I would give it a try, last week.

First, make sure your web browser will allow pop-ups.  You will need this turned on to get the results.   After you are on the site, Recruitin, you just fill out the following tabs: 

  1. Country you want to Search.  Use the pull down menu to select the country.
  2. Job Title.  Enter in the job title you are looking for.  (also click the box for similar job titles.  This way if you are searching for a Project Manager you will also pull up PM and so on.)
  3. Fill out and list the location and key words. (Use a comma to separate the words.  For example:  Columbus, Ohio, OH, Engineer, PLC, automation, solidworks)
  4. Exclude words.   Do you have any words you do not want to search for, if so list them here, also separate by using a comma.   If you do not have any words to exclude you leave it blank.
  5. Degree.   Use the pull down menu to select a specific degree or leave it blank.
  6. Finally click the button – Find your people.

You will now notice a Boolean String at the top of the page.   This is an X-ray string that is using Google to X-ray and deep dive into LinkedIn.    You can either save the string or click on “open in Google”.  If you click on open in Google, a new window will pop up with your results.  You do not need to be connected to the people on LinkedIn to see the full names.    It doesn’t matter if you are a first connection, second connection, or connected at all.

I also suggest you save your strings, if you wish to reuse them.   You will see your saved strings on the right hand side of the screen.

Try it and play around with it.    Recruitin has its own user guide here, if you need more help.  I think it works pretty good.   If you do not like writing your own strings and need some help – this could be a useful tool for you to use.

 

 

6 Steps on How to Train a NEW Recruiter…

To be a successful recruiter, you need to possess certain traits.   These are not learned they are part of who you are.    However when you do hire a new recruiter (Newbie), you cannot throw everything at them at once.   Here is a the step-by-step approach that I like to use.

  • Step 1:  Start with a job description and how to dissect it.  Next, teach the Newbie how to navigate the job boards.   You want them to be able to demonstrate they can find and deliver matching resumes to job descriptions.   They need to master this first.  It is important to know how to dissect both a resume and job description to find a match.
  • Step 2:  Searching LinkedIn and social media.   Now that your Newbie knows job boards, it is time to master the next step.   Can they find and source candidates using social media?   Get them set up on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and any other social media sites that may be useful to their sourcing.
  • Step 3:  Create a culture of learning.   There are many free webinars out there, about recruiting.   Go to YouTube and watch “how to” videos.     It is time to start learning more advanced sourcing (Boolean Strings and so on).   These first three steps are about sourcing and how to find the candidates that are active on the boards and the ones that may be passive.
  • Step 4:  Time to start talking to the candidates.   Now that your Newbies are delivering matching candidates (at least on paper), it is time to pre-screen.    Initiate conversations with candidates, verify they are interested and go over the basics.    If they are a fit, let the candidate know a Sr. Recruiter will contact them to go over the job requirements and their background in more detail.    (Let the Newbie sit and listen to your conversation with them).
  • Step 5:  Your Newbie should now also be sitting and listening to you while you talk to the client and candidate.   They need to be learning and listening to the interview prep, briefing and all 30 steps of the placement process.   All of these steps will probably take at least up to 6 months if not longer to learn…training is an investment and a marathon – not a sprint.    
  • Step 6:  Finally, when pre-screenings are accurate, Newbies are ready to be fully engaged.   Start them with a job or two as a full-cycle recruiter and see how they do.   You will need to sit and listen and be available for questions.

The goal of this six step method is to get the Newbie to be an expert, one step at a time before they move on, to the next.   

What are your thoughts?

10 Traits of a Successful Recruiter

There are certain traits I think every Recruiter needs to have, to be successful.    Here they are, in no particular order:

  1. Be structured.   Recruiting is a few simple disciplines practiced every day.
  2. Be able to adapt.   You must me able to drop what you are doing to start something else.   You never know where that next phone call is going to take you.   This is the people business, we deal with people all day long.   Even though each situation or scenario is the same – it is also different.
  3. Don’t be afraid to ask questions.   You don’t know everything.   Ask the candidate and company – they are the experts.   Keep learning and become the expert in the industry.
  4. Partner with the Candidate.   You are in this together.   Be the expert, be the advisor and counselor.   Make sure they have a good candidate experience.   They are going to get a job and if it is not yours then make sure they remember you and refer others to you.
  5. Pick-up the phone.   Too many newer recruiters are relying on technology and email.    Just pick up the phone and talk to people.
  6. Use new technology with old techniques.   You should be using social media to recruit and source.   You should be using and know boolean strings.   But you should also be networking, asking for referrals and again pick up the phone and make some cold calls.
  7. Prioritize.    What is the most important task for you to do today?    Is it sourcing new candidates?   Interview prep?  Each day is going to be different regarding which tasks are most important.
  8. Have a good home support system.   Recruiting is NOT an 8-5 job.   If that is what you want then choose another profession.  
  9. Embrace patience.   Everything doesn’t happen overnight.   My sense of urgency is not the same as others.
  10. Handle rejection.    You will hear “NO” more often than “YES”.   Get used to it.  

Did I miss any?    Leave a comment and let me know your thoughts.

8 Phrases that Describe a Successful Recruiter…

Don’t be scared to speak up.

I know there are a lot of people out there that have had at least one, if not multiple bad experiences with a recruiter. Heck, I have and I am one. (Not you Bruce Rowles. You are the best!) So, I understand if you get another call (probably your 3rd of the day if you’re a Java Developer) and you aren’t overly optimistic. But, if you do decide to spend time on the phone with one, and agree to being submitted to a job, keep in touch.

Now, I realize this is a 2-way street and that there has been a time or 2 in the past where you never heard back from your recruiter. But, there are some of us out there that actually enjoy helping people get jobs. We like calling you with updates about your interview times and preparing you with tips on what works in an interview.

We take pride in helping you re-arrange your resume’s format to make it “pop”. Enjoy telling you how to best learn about the company and person you’re meeting with and providing you with details about the job/company Monster’s hyperlink to HR fails to give you. These are some of the benefits of working with a top-notch recruiter.

So, with that being said, why would you entertain the initial phone call, talk about your job history, goals and desires, ask to be submitted for a job, dress up pretty for an interview, accept the job offered, take a drug test, get fingerprinted for the background check, fill out paperwork and then NOT show up for your first day?!?

No longer are you answering the phone when I call. You have decided to not respond to emails. Text message are no longer reaching you. You have officially disappeared from planet Earth. But why? Magic? Probably not.

More likely is that something just wasn’t quite right for you. You had a bad feeling in your gut. “Instinct”. We all get those feelings and it’s completely normal. What you DON’T want to do is ignore that recruiter who helped you get the job. Who taught you about interviewing and provided insight into processes and procedures that increased your interviewing effectiveness and led to an eventual job offer.

Don’t be scared to speak up regarding ANYTHING! Good recruiters are like agents. We represent you the way you want to be represented. If you have a question, just ask. If it’s not an answer you want, that’s okay. Now I know exactly what you want/think/feel so the next time we work together, the job I present you with will be more in-line with what you want and you are happy as a pig in…..

Get started using Boolean Strings, on linkedin

Are you using boolean strings in your recruiting and sourcing?   Why Not!?   What a great way to find the professional you are looking for.   You save money because it’s FREE and you do not have to post the expensive job ads that produce tons of resumes of unqualified candidates.    Boolean Strings will help your search so you can get the results you are looking for.

This post will focus on searching LinkedIn and narrowing down your search.   There are three main search engines to use: Google, Yahoo and Bing.    I would suggest using all three of them.   Each search engine has a different indexing system and will produce some different responses.  

Next we want to start narrowing the Boolean String so that it only does a Deep Dive into LinkedIn.   We start with a site command.

 

  •                site:linkedin.com

 

If you notice there are no spaces so far in this command.   Next, let’s say you are looking for a Mechanical Engineer, with a BSME, to work in Columbus, OH and they must have PLC and Lean Manufacturing Experience.    Do you know what to write next?  Try this:

 

  •                site:linkedin.com “Mechanical Engineer” Columbus (OH OR Ohio) Lean PLC BSME

 

This is a good basic Boolean String.   If you notice above, you do not have to type the word AND anymore if you are searching for different criteria and multiple keywords.   A simple space in-between your keywords will work.   If you look at the string above it says, we are looking in LinkedIn only, for the phrase “Mechanical Engineer” who lives in Columbus OH (we added an OR so it will look for the abbr. OH or spelled out OHIO) and key words lean, BSME and PLC.  

Hope this helps – this is pretty basic so far.    You can play with it and see if you can narrow it down, if you want.    Try it and see.

 

Boolean Search Strings—Not as Scary as you Might Think!

The first step for sourcers and recruiters is to understand the job request sitting on their desk. Then they need to put together a finely crafted Boolean search string. When we receive a job requisition we now need to condense it in such a way as to bring back excellent resumes that match that job order. Sometimes this can be a bit daunting. As an IT sourcer, I need to be educated on what the job is really asking for. If any skill seems like a foreign fleck of abstract Martian language, chances are a little research is needed. Once an understanding of the job request is gained, the fun begins.

       Taking all of the information from a job description and condensing it into a few lines can be challenging. For example, if a job request is asking for a Senior Oracle Database Developer with skills in Oracle, pl/sql, stored procedures, and Oracle XML, a Boolean string could be constructed as follows:

“oracle database developer” AND oracle AND pl/sql AND “stored procedures” AND “oracle xml”

Now, not everyone writes their resumes with these skills the same way. The opportunity to miss out on a talented professional can happen if alternative spellings aren’t accounted for. So, the revised string could look like this:

(“oracle database developer” OR “database developer”) AND oracle AND (pl/sql OR plsql OR “pl sql” OR pl-sql) AND “stored procedures” AND (“oracle xml” OR xml)

When you put a phrase in quotes, you are telling the computer to bring back results with that exact phrase. If you need to create an OR option, put the options in parenthesis.

Now, our string is much more specific. The more specific the string, the fewer amount of results will be retrieved. Also, note that NOT can be used as well. If our job request specifies that they do not want resumes reflecting work in finance, then we could add that on like this:

(“oracle database developer” OR “database developer”) AND oracle AND (pl/sql OR plsql OR “pl sql” OR pl-sql) AND “stored procedures” AND (“oracle xml” OR xml) AND NOT (finance OR banking)

Sometimes Boolean strings can be too specific. Another strategy is to find alternative names for key skills and create an OR option in your string. Many people leave off skills on their resumes because those skills may be implied in a job title. Be flexible and allow for some loosening up of key words. Not everyone writes their resumes the same way. By allowing for variations on skills or action words, your search string can yield amazing results. Be flexible, have fun, and don’t be afraid to tweak your string!

Shannon Fatigante

 

Sourcing: More than a Good Boolean String

If I told you that there was an amazing and effective tool for sourcing, would you believe me? As a Sourcing Specialist, I look at resumes all day, every day. An effective sourcer knows that finding talented people is more than just punching in key skills and hoping for the database to spit out the perfect candidate. Sourcing requires in depth research, a finely crafted Boolean search string, and perseverance. But what many sourcing specialists miss is the fact that a resume is not the whole person.

One of my responsibilities is to present quality resumes to my team of recruiters. I could very easily punch in my search string on Monster or Career Builder, pull up the resumes, and forward them to the recruiter assigned to that particular position. But how exactly does that help my team? Our computers are used in all sorts of ways to research, find, and contact people that might be a fit for a particular role. But, as sourcers, we are neglecting the most important element of finding a great talented professional! Want to know what that is? Every desk has one, most people carry this tool in their pocket or purse, and millions of dollars are spent on advertising for it. Give up? It’s the telephone!

The role of a Sourcing Specialist is more than a resume pusher. A sourcer needs to investigate those resumes that stare back at them from their computer screens. The only way to do that is to speak with the candidate. By using the telephone, a sourcer can gather important information that is typically not listed on a resume. Is this candidate interviewing with other companies? What type of communication skills does this candidate have? Is this person willing to pursue this opportunity? Will this candidate travel or relocate? Can this person pass a background and drug screening? And better yet, is this person a good fit for the opportunity?

When we take the time to pick up the phone and speak with talented professionals, we are, in essence, being an advocate for both the candidate and the recruiter. The candidate feels valued and humanized and the recruiter is armed with important information to match this person with the best fitting opportunity. When we take the time to make a phone call, the resume becomes more than a piece of paper. That resume becomes a real person with real potential for new and exciting opportunities… and isn’t that why we do what we do?

Shannon Fatigante