Everything is an Interview…

Are you looking for a job?    Did you send your resume in to a potential employer?   Keep one thing in mind – Everything you do and every conversation you have – IS AN INTERVIEW.  Whether you are talking to the Manager, to Human Resources or to the Front Desk Receptionist, Everything is an interview.     

  1. Do not have a weird font or graphics on your resume
  2. Do not have an unprofessional voicemail
  3. Do not have an unprofessional email id
  4. When meeting someone for coffee to network, dress professional and pay for the coffee
  5. Be prepared – expect that person calling you to be an Hiring Manager
  6. Respect and professionalism
  7. Social Media – keep it professional.    Companies will search your social media, be prepared and delete the party pictures from college.

When being interviewed or considered for a job, you are under a microscope.   A lot of times the companies will look for a reason not to hire you instead of reasons to hire you.    Do not give them a reason.   The little things you do, do matter:   Hold the door open when walking into a room or building, have good eye contact when speaking, have a firm hand shake, sit-up in your chair and speak slowly and clearly and thank them for their time and consideration.

Your resume will get you in the door but how you portray yourself will get you the job.

The Many Hats of a Successful Recruiter…

A Successful Recruiter needs to wear many hats.   Recruiters do not just go out source/find new talent and move on.   Recruiters need to wear many different hats and do many different jobs to be successful.   Here is my list in Alphabetical order.

A Successful Recruiter is also a:

  1. Business Partner
  2. Closer
  3. Collections Agent
  4. Cyber Sleuth
  5. Friend
  6. Good Listener
  7. Interview Coach
  8. Job Coach
  9. Life Coach
  10. Negotiator
  11. Salesperson
  12. Sourcer

What other hats do you think a Successful Recruiter wears?

 

 

Has the Hiring Process Gotten Out of Hand?

I certainly think so. 

Having hired over 13,000 people in the past 10 years, I will tell you that the current requirements to hire a new employee have become daunting.  I am beginning to think that a large portion of the unemployment rate is self inflicted.  Each year, we are finding more ways to screen out candidates instead of finding ways to include or grow good talent.  Here is listing of just a few of the hiring requirements that our members have had to comply with in order to be considered for employment.

  • – Resume submittal into an applicant tracking system
  • – Telephone interview
  • – Hiring Assessment (Six assessments is the highest number that I have heard of thus far.)
  • – IQ test (Yes, you read correctly.)
  • – Personal interviews (11 are the highest so far)
  • – Group interview (the largest panel has been 12 members)
  • – Requirement to submit a 5 minute, self-developed video of why you are qualified for the position.
  • – 15 minute stand-up presentation including a PowerPoint presentation.
  • – Submittal of a marketing or territory sales plan
  • – Submittal of your latest W-2
  • – Confidentially agreement and non-compete agreement
  • – Filling out an Application for Employment
  • – Drug and background check
  • – I-9 identification including 2 pieces of government issued ID or passport.

At any point in the hiring process, someone involved in the evaluation can say “no”.  “No” is a safe answer.  There is little risk in saying “no”.  Saying “yes” commits you to the decision and to the success of the candidate.  I’ll take the risk.  Making a new hire successful is a responsibility that I accept.

Let’s trim down the list and say “yes” more often. 

What do you think?

Ken Lazar

Recruiters: New Boolean Sourcing Tool – Recruitin

I was recently told about a new tool – Recruitin.    I was told it let you X-ray LinkedIn, by creating the boolean for you, so I figured I would give it a try, last week.

First, make sure your web browser will allow pop-ups.  You will need this turned on to get the results.   After you are on the site, Recruitin, you just fill out the following tabs: 

  1. Country you want to Search.  Use the pull down menu to select the country.
  2. Job Title.  Enter in the job title you are looking for.  (also click the box for similar job titles.  This way if you are searching for a Project Manager you will also pull up PM and so on.)
  3. Fill out and list the location and key words. (Use a comma to separate the words.  For example:  Columbus, Ohio, OH, Engineer, PLC, automation, solidworks)
  4. Exclude words.   Do you have any words you do not want to search for, if so list them here, also separate by using a comma.   If you do not have any words to exclude you leave it blank.
  5. Degree.   Use the pull down menu to select a specific degree or leave it blank.
  6. Finally click the button – Find your people.

You will now notice a Boolean String at the top of the page.   This is an X-ray string that is using Google to X-ray and deep dive into LinkedIn.    You can either save the string or click on “open in Google”.  If you click on open in Google, a new window will pop up with your results.  You do not need to be connected to the people on LinkedIn to see the full names.    It doesn’t matter if you are a first connection, second connection, or connected at all.

I also suggest you save your strings, if you wish to reuse them.   You will see your saved strings on the right hand side of the screen.

Try it and play around with it.    Recruitin has its own user guide here, if you need more help.  I think it works pretty good.   If you do not like writing your own strings and need some help – this could be a useful tool for you to use.

 

 

RPO: Vendor or Partner?

RPO:  Do you want a VENDOR or a PARTNER?

There is so much movement in the RPO space and some of you may be saying.. RP WHAT? Recruitment Process Outsourcing has been around for a few decades, but recently what was once a controversial concept seems to have beaten the perception held by skeptics that thought that “outsourcing” was a bad thing, or that it would just go away.

Several Higher profile acquisitions are beginning to make RPO a way of doing business that is not only effective but also competitive. IBM and SAP have acquired companies to serve as their RPO arm, but just remember bigger is not always better.

When you hire an RPO firm, they need to be a fit for YOUR culture. Often the first experience any new hire will have with your brand and hiring experience will be in the hands of the RPO firm you partner with.  So ask yourselves, do you want a VENDOR or a PARTNER?

 

First off you have to decide WHY RPO?

I have a hint, its not always cheaper… but it should always be more effective.

When thinking about the cost of hire often times RPO services are not always cheaper… where you get your money’s worth is in reducing the time vacancies are open, because the cost of vacancy can cripple you, and it’s a silent bill that accrues interest and fees at an alarming rate.  You need to increase deficiencies and remove barriers, while increasing candidate experience and brand awareness where

 

What are some of the benefits of working with an RPO?

  1. Specialize in the process of hiring
  2. Strong efficiencies based on bulk process
  3. Reporting, Data, and Analytics
  4. Stabilized costs

What can be some of the areas that could be an issue?

  1. Getting both sides to agree on how to best represent the culture, while adhering to process
  2. Change isn’t easy but it is necessary, if you don’t have a willingness to change, it won’t be any better
  3. The RPO firm only worries if it is able to hit SLAs and KPIs and think that is enough. You need them to explain the data, be proactive and forecast not just react
  4. Lack of flexibility / one size fits all approach. The process will work, but there will always be nuances that need tweaks to make it your own
  5. Duplicate Efforts, internal partners don’t adhere to process and continue to duplicate efforts.

How do I know if I have the right Partner?

  1. SPEND TIME at the delivery center
  2. Be open to the expertise they have to offer, but really involve ALL key stakeholders in decisions around process and change
  3. Give it a chance to work
  4. Check References
  5. Remember a partnership takes two … both sides have to work at the relationship
  6. Communicate, Communicate, Communicate

6 Steps on How to Train a NEW Recruiter…

To be a successful recruiter, you need to possess certain traits.   These are not learned they are part of who you are.    However when you do hire a new recruiter (Newbie), you cannot throw everything at them at once.   Here is a the step-by-step approach that I like to use.

  • Step 1:  Start with a job description and how to dissect it.  Next, teach the Newbie how to navigate the job boards.   You want them to be able to demonstrate they can find and deliver matching resumes to job descriptions.   They need to master this first.  It is important to know how to dissect both a resume and job description to find a match.
  • Step 2:  Searching LinkedIn and social media.   Now that your Newbie knows job boards, it is time to master the next step.   Can they find and source candidates using social media?   Get them set up on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and any other social media sites that may be useful to their sourcing.
  • Step 3:  Create a culture of learning.   There are many free webinars out there, about recruiting.   Go to YouTube and watch “how to” videos.     It is time to start learning more advanced sourcing (Boolean Strings and so on).   These first three steps are about sourcing and how to find the candidates that are active on the boards and the ones that may be passive.
  • Step 4:  Time to start talking to the candidates.   Now that your Newbies are delivering matching candidates (at least on paper), it is time to pre-screen.    Initiate conversations with candidates, verify they are interested and go over the basics.    If they are a fit, let the candidate know a Sr. Recruiter will contact them to go over the job requirements and their background in more detail.    (Let the Newbie sit and listen to your conversation with them).
  • Step 5:  Your Newbie should now also be sitting and listening to you while you talk to the client and candidate.   They need to be learning and listening to the interview prep, briefing and all 30 steps of the placement process.   All of these steps will probably take at least up to 6 months if not longer to learn…training is an investment and a marathon – not a sprint.    
  • Step 6:  Finally, when pre-screenings are accurate, Newbies are ready to be fully engaged.   Start them with a job or two as a full-cycle recruiter and see how they do.   You will need to sit and listen and be available for questions.

The goal of this six step method is to get the Newbie to be an expert, one step at a time before they move on, to the next.   

What are your thoughts?

Recruiters offer HOPE…

Recruiters need to remember the one thing they offer candidates, is HOPE.  I recently participated and presented at the Scioto Ridge Job Networking Group, Tuesday Tune-up.  I was there to help Job Seekers search for work using social networking, using internet tools and to give tips and suggestions.   One of the main points and discussions was on, how to work with a Recruiter.  I had many conversations, with different individuals – all looking for one thing – HOPE.

The next candidate you talk to – even if they are not a fit for your opening or company – Remember you are still able to give them the HOPE they need to help find work, in this economy.  Maybe it is a hint on how to improve their resume, an interview tip, an internet site that may help their search, a networking group – or any bit of information that may help them.  Take a minute with each candidate this week, this month or longer and give them HOPE.

8 Phrases that Describe a Successful Recruiter…

A Good Recruiter is:

  1. Having relationships with a side of good timing.
  2. A partner/advisor.  
  3. A candidate and client ally.
  4. A person you need most when you least expect it.
  5. An interview coach/job coach.
  6. A salesman and negotiator.
  7. A cyber sleuth.
  8. A networking expert.

What would you add or delete from this list?

 

See also my post on top traits of a successful recruiter.

Networking: Enough to go Around…

People always ask me, why I network and share my ideas?  Why would I help a competitor or another recruiter gain expertise and knowledge?  Simple, there is enough to go around, try to build good karma.

As you know, Recruiters don’t always have the best name/reputation in the business.  There are “used car salesman” recruiters that give honest recruiters a bad name and a bad rap.  But if I do the little things, with my fellow recruiters and my candidates, I am changing that view, one conversation at a time.

I try to keep in contact with old candidates.   I network with them.    I communicate and partner with them.    I may not have the right job for them today but you never know what will be open tomorrow.  Staying in contact with candidates also helps me get candidate referrals.   Good candidates always seem to know other good candidates.  

If I am unable to help a candidate today and they need a job – ASAP, I refer them to other recruiters.  You never know who may be able to help them.  Networking and sharing candidates, ideas, procedures with other recruiters,  will make me a better recruiter and a better person.   And it helps the candidate who needs that job. 

Networking and sharing helps me identify the candidates and recruiters, who I want to partner with.  Are there Recruiters who help me and give me new ideas?  Of course there is.  Are there Recruiters who do not share?  Yep, there are those also. The ones that share and network, I feel will also be successful.

In short – there are a lot of good people out there and enough knowledge and networking to go around.  Try it and pay it forward.

The Power of Networking

Why don’t more people NetworkIt boggles my mind, especially in this type of economy – it is not who applies to the job first, BUT who you know and who knows you.    Everyone should get to know their local Recruiters.   You never know when you may need one.

Networking is simple.  It is staying in touch.  It is asking questions to the experts and answering questions.  Most people I have found and was able to hire for my openings, were not from my first conversation but from staying in contact with them and talking to them over time.  Networking is a time commitment – IT IS A RECRUITING COMMITMENT!

An easy way to get started is to first, go to LinkedIn and find groups, in your geographic area or specialty and join them.  Become involved with the local and industry leaders.  If a group does not exist – create one.  Not only have I created the Recruiter Files LinkedIn Group, but I have joined many industry groups (#Hire Friday and ere.net). Plus I have joined some local groups (Linkedworking Columbus and Network Pittsburgh).   LinkedIn allows you to join up to 50 groups at a time.

Network in your community and your industry – see who you can meet.   Also, review the Social Networking’s Guide for Finding Employment.

10 Traits of a Successful Recruiter

There are certain traits I think every Recruiter needs to have, to be successful.    Here they are, in no particular order:

  1. Be structured.   Recruiting is a few simple disciplines practiced every day.
  2. Be able to adapt.   You must me able to drop what you are doing to start something else.   You never know where that next phone call is going to take you.   This is the people business, we deal with people all day long.   Even though each situation or scenario is the same – it is also different.
  3. Don’t be afraid to ask questions.   You don’t know everything.   Ask the candidate and company – they are the experts.   Keep learning and become the expert in the industry.
  4. Partner with the Candidate.   You are in this together.   Be the expert, be the advisor and counselor.   Make sure they have a good candidate experience.   They are going to get a job and if it is not yours then make sure they remember you and refer others to you.
  5. Pick-up the phone.   Too many newer recruiters are relying on technology and email.    Just pick up the phone and talk to people.
  6. Use new technology with old techniques.   You should be using social media to recruit and source.   You should be using and know boolean strings.   But you should also be networking, asking for referrals and again pick up the phone and make some cold calls.
  7. Prioritize.    What is the most important task for you to do today?    Is it sourcing new candidates?   Interview prep?  Each day is going to be different regarding which tasks are most important.
  8. Have a good home support system.   Recruiting is NOT an 8-5 job.   If that is what you want then choose another profession.  
  9. Embrace patience.   Everything doesn’t happen overnight.   My sense of urgency is not the same as others.
  10. Handle rejection.    You will hear “NO” more often than “YES”.   Get used to it.  

Did I miss any?    Leave a comment and let me know your thoughts.

8 Phrases that Describe a Successful Recruiter…

Social Networking’s Guide to Finding Employment

Social MediaWith the unemployment rates at an all time high, it is essential, now more than ever, to tap into alternative ways of getting noticed—and getting hired. Recruiters and Talent Acquisition Specialists have relied mainly on the job boards for their pool of resumes. Sites like CareerBuilder.com, Monster.com, Dice.com, and many others are over-flowing with resumes from every industry and educational level. With such a large pool of competition, how can anyone become noticed?

Many recruiters rely on a well-crafted Boolean search string and wait for the website to spit out a handful of resumes that match their job description. But this method can only give recruiters a list of skills, completely overlooking the essence of who these job seekers really are. Most job seekers do not understand the processes recruiters use to find talented professionals, and as a result, become overlooked. The use of social networking creates a new layer for job seekers. The power of sites like LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter are drawing attention. There are millions of users on these sites. This is no longer a want-ad kind of world—this is a world of cut throat competition based on who you know and who you impress. Social networking can bridge the gap between a nameless resume to a memorable meeting with executives and recruiters ready to put you to work.

LinkedIn is a networking site geared toward professionals. This site has over 135 million members with the majority over the age of 25 making an annual income in the six figure range. LinkedIn members are serious about their professions by linking up with other professionals in and out of their industries. LinkedIn members conduct themselves in a more professional matter than members of Facebook which is geared more towards casual contact. LinkedIn also comes up in the top 5% of all Google.com searches. It is a key site to present your best professional face to the working world. Connecting with co-workers and friends on LinkedIn is appropriate; however, the key is to not limit yourself to those you know. By expanding your LinkedIn connections, there are more opportunities to network with professionals working in companies you might be interested in. Also, joining LinkedIn groups can give you an inside view of company news.

LinkedIn is not the only social networking site that can help land jobs. Facebook and Twitter also have a huge web presence. Many potential employers scan your Twitter feeds and Facebook posts in an effort to get to know you. Updating your statuses to reflect that you are job hunting will get attention. People are more than resumes and companies recognize that. In fact, recently a company posted an advertisement for an investment analyst but instead of receiving traditional resumes, job seekers were asked to provide their LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook links along with a video message as to why these candidates wanted this job. They are most interested in what people are like, what they are like to work with, how they think. By utilizing social media, hiring companies can get a better feel for potential hires and avoid the jungle of faceless resumes.

If you are still not convinced that social media can help you land a job, try these statistics on for size. For every six people, one gets hired using social media. Over half of job seekers use LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter to find jobs. When polled 18,400,000 people say that Facebook got them a job, 8,000,000 give Twitter credit for their jobs, and 10,200,000 people credit LinkedIn with their current positions. And remember, the average LinkedIn user makes over $100,000 in annual income. Do I have your attention?

So, how exactly do sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn help you network and land a great job? First, it is common knowledge that having an inside contact is incredibly beneficial for finding a great job. That’s how I got my current job, but not everyone has a second cousin or friend of a friend that can give inside information or push your resume to the top of the stack. This is where savvy networking can educate you and bring attention to your profile with the big bosses. For instance, searching LinkedIn for company employees can bring you to the person that might end up interviewing you. This is the time to send a private message to connect—only. Pushing your resume during this first contact is ineffective and will most likely get you nowhere. Begin by asking questions about his or her job and develop a relationship. Your contact will be more likely to endorse you if you begin this way—trust me. Also, use groups to connect with people. You will most likely link up with someone in the same group verses going straight for the HR person who will delete your Inmail. And don’t stop there, find out about the person doing the interviewing. Pointing out commonalities goes a long way in relationship building and elbow rubbing.

Using social media has its advantages for getting you noticed. Millions of members take part in professional websites. It is a bridge that fills the gap between an anonymous resume and your professional presence. Recruiters and hiring managers alike troll these sites for potential hires. Introduce yourself and you will get that virtual handshake—that’s a promise.

Relocating – It doesn’t have to be an uphill battle!!

Positive story….related back to getting the recruiter to take you seriously about moving back to Michigan when you live out-of-state.

I have a consultant coming back to Michigan/his family and starting at Mercedes-Benz Financial Services on Monday Feb 13th!!!!! He’s a Mainframe Developer that beat out many candidates for the role. It wasn’t just because of his technical background but also the way he was presented to the client and his positive and enthusiastic demeanor that set him apart from the others….he simply had a great attitude throughout the process. It’s the way your relationship should be with your recruiter. It’s a 2 way street that needs to meet each other’s expectations and be on the same page. Clear and honest communication from the start will get you everywhere, remember we are in business to get you the offer/job!!!

On another note, don’t forget you have one (1) chance to make a first impression with our clients. That comes from what we(recruiters) are telling our clients about you i.e.: why you are a fit and how you presented yourself in person when we met and so on plus YOUR RESUME. Take the time to work with the recruiter on what needs to be in your resume because if those buzz words aren’t literally in your resume you will sometimes get passed over. But never, ever misrepresent yourself. Good luck to those aggressively and passively looking.

Feel free to take a look at my current opportunities at www.experisjobs.com. I am in Southfield, Mi if you would like to meet and discuss what you are looking for in your next role. Have a productive and fun day! monica.dejager@experis.com 248.226.1366

11 Reasons the grass is not always greener…

Have you ever heard the saying – “The grass is not always greener”?   Basically I think this means – look at what you have before you jump into something new.

Are you looking for a new job or career path?   Before you start searching, you should first ask yourself:  What do you currently have?  What are some tangible and intangible reasons on what is positive about your current job?    What are some items that might not be available at your new job?  If you want to leave for more money, my advice is:  Salary should not be the only item.

 

11 Positive Items about your current job to consider (no specific order):

  1. Do you have cheaper insurance premiums?
  2. Current location is closer to home?
  3. Flexibility in hours?
  4. A good 401k match and retirement plan?
  5. Good working relationship with your co-workers and/or boss?
  6. Promotion and career opportunities?
  7. Do you love what you’re doing?
  8. Company outings and trips?
  9. Bonuses/profit-sharing?
  10. Do you have tenure?
  11. Does your job offer you the ability to sustain a good quality of life?

If you are truly unhappy and want to find another job – Good luck and I wish you the best in your career.   If I can help you, as a recruiter, find your Dream Job then I want to do that.  I enjoy helping candidates find their next job and career. 

Please consider the grass and where you are standing before you start your search.   Do not waste the company’s time, your time or mine – if you have not thought it through.    Also if you do get another offer – now you get to think about the “Counter-Offer.”  

 

 

Job Seekers and Recruiters: Are you on about.me?

A friend showed me About.me this week.   What a great site and a way for everyone to have their own splash page.   This is a great new site that allows the person to display their background, specialities and contact information. (My page is here)

 

Job Seekers – Recruiting is evolving and we search the internet for candidates before we even put ads on the job boards.   Why not have your background, specialities and contact information all in one place, easier for us to contact you?   In a paragraph or 2 explain your background and tell your story.   Everyone has a story and you need to tell yours.   As a Job Seeker you should make it as easy as possible for recruiters and hiring managers to find you and contact you.  

 

Recruiters – We are a dime a dozen, there are recruiters everywhere.   I try to differentiate myself to my client companies and the people who I represent.   This helps me do just that.   This gives them a background of me and how to contact me.   I plan on using this as a personal brand tool.   Not all recruiters are the same and work the same.   I want everyone to know what to expect from me and what I expect from them, if I am their recruiter.

 

Question – What do you do to separate yourself from the pack?

 

 

Bruce Rowles