Do you accept a counter-offer?

Would you accept a counter-offer?   You need to answer this even before you start interviewing elsewhere.    But please note:  Most people are interviewing for a reason.    So think about it – why are you looking for another job?

The Best Advice I can give is to Google the words “Counter Offer.”   You need to read all of the literature out there.   First, read the articles and blogs about accepting it.   Next, read the percentages of you staying with that company, if you do accept it.   Finally, read the Pros and the Cons.

Accepting a new job is a life decision and I will not push you to do it.   I will give you all of the means so you can make the right decision for you and your family.   Go and Google “Counter Offer” and see what you find.

Get started using Boolean Strings, on linkedin

Are you using boolean strings in your recruiting and sourcing?   Why Not!?   What a great way to find the professional you are looking for.   You save money because it’s FREE and you do not have to post the expensive job ads that produce tons of resumes of unqualified candidates.    Boolean Strings will help your search so you can get the results you are looking for.

This post will focus on searching LinkedIn and narrowing down your search.   There are three main search engines to use: Google, Yahoo and Bing.    I would suggest using all three of them.   Each search engine has a different indexing system and will produce some different responses.  

Next we want to start narrowing the Boolean String so that it only does a Deep Dive into LinkedIn.   We start with a site command.

 

  •                site:linkedin.com

 

If you notice there are no spaces so far in this command.   Next, let’s say you are looking for a Mechanical Engineer, with a BSME, to work in Columbus, OH and they must have PLC and Lean Manufacturing Experience.    Do you know what to write next?  Try this:

 

  •                site:linkedin.com “Mechanical Engineer” Columbus (OH OR Ohio) Lean PLC BSME

 

This is a good basic Boolean String.   If you notice above, you do not have to type the word AND anymore if you are searching for different criteria and multiple keywords.   A simple space in-between your keywords will work.   If you look at the string above it says, we are looking in LinkedIn only, for the phrase “Mechanical Engineer” who lives in Columbus OH (we added an OR so it will look for the abbr. OH or spelled out OHIO) and key words lean, BSME and PLC.  

Hope this helps – this is pretty basic so far.    You can play with it and see if you can narrow it down, if you want.    Try it and see.

 

How moving to another country helped me be a better sourcer…

When I moved from Chile to the US, I could read and write in English, but speaking… well that was a different story all together. Any time you learn a foreign language, there is a lot of emphasis in the written word and being able to read, but not enough in the being able to speak part. My first year in the US was my last year of High School! Scary enough about moving in your senior year, but imagine that you know nobody, you really can’t communicate with anybody and the culture is totally foreign to you!
So I had to learn, and learn fast. I took my dictionary everywhere (this WAS before laptops) and I had to practice with whoever would not laugh at me! In about 6 months I was ready to converse and able to know enough to even get a job.
How does this relate to sourcing? In many ways, sourcing is all about understanding and being able to do research and find people who match the skills you are looking for. Once you find someone, it’s all about how that particular person can fit in the role. If you are sourcing on a position that you don’t really understand, you have to investigate and get clear understanding and sometimes that can take time. Sourcing for Niche positions can be very tiring and tedious sometimes, you have to get creative, think outside the box, figure out how to get your find those people that aren’t on the job boards and so on.
Having to work hard and fast at being able to communicate in English and learn the culture has helped me in many ways in my life and career, but now that I have to always be looking for people, and figure out if they are really a great fit for the jobs I have, going through that experience helps me on a daily basis to stay focused on the end goal which is ultimately being able to put people to work!

Boolean Search Strings—Not as Scary as you Might Think!

The first step for sourcers and recruiters is to understand the job request sitting on their desk. Then they need to put together a finely crafted Boolean search string. When we receive a job requisition we now need to condense it in such a way as to bring back excellent resumes that match that job order. Sometimes this can be a bit daunting. As an IT sourcer, I need to be educated on what the job is really asking for. If any skill seems like a foreign fleck of abstract Martian language, chances are a little research is needed. Once an understanding of the job request is gained, the fun begins.

       Taking all of the information from a job description and condensing it into a few lines can be challenging. For example, if a job request is asking for a Senior Oracle Database Developer with skills in Oracle, pl/sql, stored procedures, and Oracle XML, a Boolean string could be constructed as follows:

“oracle database developer” AND oracle AND pl/sql AND “stored procedures” AND “oracle xml”

Now, not everyone writes their resumes with these skills the same way. The opportunity to miss out on a talented professional can happen if alternative spellings aren’t accounted for. So, the revised string could look like this:

(“oracle database developer” OR “database developer”) AND oracle AND (pl/sql OR plsql OR “pl sql” OR pl-sql) AND “stored procedures” AND (“oracle xml” OR xml)

When you put a phrase in quotes, you are telling the computer to bring back results with that exact phrase. If you need to create an OR option, put the options in parenthesis.

Now, our string is much more specific. The more specific the string, the fewer amount of results will be retrieved. Also, note that NOT can be used as well. If our job request specifies that they do not want resumes reflecting work in finance, then we could add that on like this:

(“oracle database developer” OR “database developer”) AND oracle AND (pl/sql OR plsql OR “pl sql” OR pl-sql) AND “stored procedures” AND (“oracle xml” OR xml) AND NOT (finance OR banking)

Sometimes Boolean strings can be too specific. Another strategy is to find alternative names for key skills and create an OR option in your string. Many people leave off skills on their resumes because those skills may be implied in a job title. Be flexible and allow for some loosening up of key words. Not everyone writes their resumes the same way. By allowing for variations on skills or action words, your search string can yield amazing results. Be flexible, have fun, and don’t be afraid to tweak your string!

Shannon Fatigante

 

Sourcing: More than a Good Boolean String

If I told you that there was an amazing and effective tool for sourcing, would you believe me? As a Sourcing Specialist, I look at resumes all day, every day. An effective sourcer knows that finding talented people is more than just punching in key skills and hoping for the database to spit out the perfect candidate. Sourcing requires in depth research, a finely crafted Boolean search string, and perseverance. But what many sourcing specialists miss is the fact that a resume is not the whole person.

One of my responsibilities is to present quality resumes to my team of recruiters. I could very easily punch in my search string on Monster or Career Builder, pull up the resumes, and forward them to the recruiter assigned to that particular position. But how exactly does that help my team? Our computers are used in all sorts of ways to research, find, and contact people that might be a fit for a particular role. But, as sourcers, we are neglecting the most important element of finding a great talented professional! Want to know what that is? Every desk has one, most people carry this tool in their pocket or purse, and millions of dollars are spent on advertising for it. Give up? It’s the telephone!

The role of a Sourcing Specialist is more than a resume pusher. A sourcer needs to investigate those resumes that stare back at them from their computer screens. The only way to do that is to speak with the candidate. By using the telephone, a sourcer can gather important information that is typically not listed on a resume. Is this candidate interviewing with other companies? What type of communication skills does this candidate have? Is this person willing to pursue this opportunity? Will this candidate travel or relocate? Can this person pass a background and drug screening? And better yet, is this person a good fit for the opportunity?

When we take the time to pick up the phone and speak with talented professionals, we are, in essence, being an advocate for both the candidate and the recruiter. The candidate feels valued and humanized and the recruiter is armed with important information to match this person with the best fitting opportunity. When we take the time to make a phone call, the resume becomes more than a piece of paper. That resume becomes a real person with real potential for new and exciting opportunities… and isn’t that why we do what we do?

Shannon Fatigante

Twitter and Social Recruiting

Recruiting has evolved and Social Media is here (and has been here for years now – where have you been?).    People ask me all the time – can you find candidates on twitter and the answer is YES.Social Media   Just last month, I placed a candidate on a PERM job and I sourced them from twitter.   

 

Twitter is also a great tool for broadcasting your opportunities and the jobs you are recruiting for.    Recruiters – do you have job seekers calling you daily or weekly to see if you have any new jobs, for them?   Now tell them to follow you on twitter and that you post all of your current opportunities and jobs there.   Now you have more time to do other duties – like recruiting.

 

Evolve in your practice and try something new.  Let me Challenge you – try to find candidates using Social Media.   Try something new and see what happens.

 

There are many resources out there to get started and to show you how to recruit using Social Media.   Go on YouTube, visit blogs – see how people are using it and being successful.    I know I do.   Here is a video I found that may help the Beginner.

 

My purpose…

I am a recruiter who loves what I do.     I like to learn new innovative ways to do my job and to better my craft.   I love sharing what I learn with others out there, in the recruiting industry and in the world in general.  

 

I have been recruiting since 1999 – A lot has changed since then.   This is an ever-changing job and profession, which is one of the main reasons why I enjoy it so much.   I was told once that Recruiting is “A FEW SIMPLE DISCIPLINES PRACTICED EVERYDAY” and this is so true.   Even though you must do these disciplines daily, the way you do them has evolved.  I will mostly write about these changes/updates and how I use them to recruit.    Some might say these are the secrets recruiters use to help their clients and candidates get the job they are looking for.

 

I am hoping this is useful to other recruiters and job seekers.  Feel free to comment and ask any questions you may have to me and the others who have volunteered to contribute to the site.  These are our opinions and thoughts – and with over 100 years of combined experience we are still learning too.  Welcome to…THE RECRUITER FILES.