Recruiter Potluck

Do you work in an office setting with others? You probably have had a Potluck, where your co-workers would bring different food items for everyone to eat. Some are good at making desserts, others a main dish, and still others preferred to bring the plates, cups, napkins, and drinks. Everyone is good at something and that is what they chose to share with everyone else.

Recruiting can be the same way. I learned how to be a Recruiter by the “Potluck Method”. When I started, I worked a full desk. Not only did I have to find the candidates, but I had to find the jobs to place them at. I worked around 8-12 other Recruiters who were also working a full desk. Some of the recruiters were new and some had been in the industry for over 20+ years. I started to identify the better Recruiters from the average Recruiters. What made them stand out? What were they good at? What was Recruiter 1 better at and what was Recruiter 2 better at?

Recruiter 1 was very good at getting to know her candidates. What made them tick, what were they really looking for in a new position? She was a great listener and knew how to ask the right questions. How did she do that? She had a knack for making them feel at ease and at home – but how?

Recruiter 2 on the other hand was good at interview prep. When his candidate received an interview, they were prepped and ready to win the interview to get the job. He spent a lot of time walking them through expectations and the overall interview process. But what did he say? What was he really sharing with them?

Recruiter 3 was incredible at cold calling and getting new business. It seemed like every call she made she was picking up new business with a new company. She always knew what to say.

Finding out who is best at different aspects of your role and learning from them is critical. Personally, I stand up and go sit at the person’s desk, sometimes for just 10 minutes and sometimes for an hour however, I would listen intently on what they said and how they said it. What are they doing, and how are they doing it? Most Recruiters are really good at 1 or 2 things and if you can learn from the best and successfully adopt these traits you will be a great Recruiter.

My point is not everyone is an expert at everything. As a Recruiter, I look at my desk and my work and constantly look to learn from those around me. Maybe I have gotten into a rut and my interviews have not been getting hired. Then go back to the basics – learn from your peers. How are they doing interview prep? Recruiting has evolved and has changed; we need to evolve with it. But don’t forget the basics. Pick what you can from the experts/co-workers and make it your own.

Recruiters: What is your First Impression, to Job Seekers?

Do you know what your first impression is on others?   When speaking with Job Seekers what impression do you leave?  

I believe first impressions are one of the keys to recruiting success.   Everyone we talk to has a problem that they want us to solve.      

If you are talking to a Job Seeker, for the first time, what is the impression you want to leave with them?    Are they applying to your job advert?   Were they referred to you from a friend?  Are they calling you back?    Why are they calling you and how can you help them out?   How can they help you?  Are you listening to their problem?   All Job Seekers are not the same – do not treat them that way.   You have to listen to what they are actually saying.  Why are they looking for a new job?  How can you help them?  When I am talking to a new Job Seeker, I want them to know that I am their partner and ally, their Trusted Advisor.   True, they may not be a fit for the job I am recruiting for but I want to give them some kind of advice or direction, to help them in their job search.   

Too many recruiters treat the job seekers like a herd of cattle.    Take the extra time (just a couple of minutes) and spend it talking with them.    A majority of my candidates are from referrals.   They reach out to me directly through LinkedIn, Twitter and Social Media.   I can’t help all of them find jobs – not even close – but what I can give them is some advice and hopefully Hope, in their job search.

Let them know up front, what to expect from you and as a new Job Seeker, what you expect from them.    Keep them in the loop the entire process.  Don’t be afraid to give them the bad news as well as the good.  Make them feel at ease while working with you and make sure they feel that they are an intimate part of this process.   The new Job Seeker should be involved throughout so they can start feeling comfortable with how you recruit.   As stated above, be their true Consultant and Trusted Advisor.  This is your one chance to put yourself in that category with them, versus just another staffing firm.

Think back, on your last Job Seeker.   What was your first impression, on them?  Can you do better?