Everything is an Interview…

Are you looking for a job?    Did you send your resume in to a potential employer?   Keep one thing in mind – Everything you do and every conversation you have – IS AN INTERVIEW.  Whether you are talking to the Manager, to Human Resources or to the Front Desk Receptionist, Everything is an interview.     

  1. Do not have a weird font or graphics on your resume
  2. Do not have an unprofessional voicemail
  3. Do not have an unprofessional email id
  4. When meeting someone for coffee to network, dress professional and pay for the coffee
  5. Be prepared – expect that person calling you to be an Hiring Manager
  6. Respect and professionalism
  7. Social Media – keep it professional.    Companies will search your social media, be prepared and delete the party pictures from college.

When being interviewed or considered for a job, you are under a microscope.   A lot of times the companies will look for a reason not to hire you instead of reasons to hire you.    Do not give them a reason.   The little things you do, do matter:   Hold the door open when walking into a room or building, have good eye contact when speaking, have a firm hand shake, sit-up in your chair and speak slowly and clearly and thank them for their time and consideration.

Your resume will get you in the door but how you portray yourself will get you the job.

Jobseekers: Research everything and be prepared…

You applied for a job and have received a call back to set-up an interview. Great!! Now what? It’s time for you to do even more research. As they say in Boy Scouts, “Be Prepared.” You need to learn and discover as much as you can about the Company, Job and even the Hiring Manager. Here are the 10 Things everyone should do prior to a job interview.

  1. Go back and print out the job description. Study it. What does it really say the requirements are? What are the qualifications? Start writing down examples of what you have done and match that up to what the Company is looking for.
  2. Google the Company. Have they been in the news lately? Are they a public company – can you find their last quarter report?
  3. Google the Hiring Manager. Have you visited their LinkedIn Page? How long have they been with the company?
  4. Read and Re-read the Company’s Website.
  5. Visit your on-line profile. (you should have done this before you applied) but do it again. When you Google your name – what comes up? Do you have a professional image on-line?
  6. Network – do you know anyone who works at the Company? Try to gain knowledge of the environment and atmosphere from current and past employees.
  7. Be ready for the tough interview questions. What are your goals? Where do you see yourself in 5 years? Tell me a time when…?
  8. Review your resume – be prepared to explain any gaps. Do not talk negative about a current or former Company or Manager.
  9. Practice Interviewing with a spouse, family member or friend. People do not Interview daily. Even though you think you are ready, practicing will help you overcome some of the nervousness.
  10. Research and practice your closing statement. Why are YOU the best fit for the job?

What other suggestions would you give to someone looking for a job?

Fear of the Invisible

In all my experience with preparing candidates for interviews, the hardest interviews that people have are with phone interviews. And understandably so – phone interviews are a lot harder than the face-to-face interview. Not only are you dealing entirely with verbal cues as to the interviewer’s interest, but you are also on the self-timer when it comes to answers. Go too long, and you’ve lost the interest of the person on the other end of the line. Go too short, and you can be interpreted as lacking experience and credibility for the job you are interviewing for.

You know the saying “an ounce of preparation is worth a pound of cure?” Nothing could apply more directly for the phone interview. Preparation is the key to getting to the next step in the hiring process, and being passed over by the recruiter for the next candidate.

First, start by doing your research on the company and the position. What are they looking for? What deficits does the company have that you can immediately fill with your skills and experience? How do you fix their problem, and fill in the needs of the company?

Next, research the individual you will be interviewing with. Put their name in on Google and see what comes up. Check out their LinkedIn account to view their background. If you can draw parallels with them and find common ground by which you can both work, your conversation will go that much easier on interview day.

Finally, prepare your answers to the interview. Brevity is key on this one: Don’t go so long that you lose their attention, but don’t give too little detail that you don’t answer the question. Try to have your answers prepared for thirty seconds or less. If you have more to share, you can always ask if they want you to continue, or if you have answered their question.

The phone interview does not have to be as intimidating as it sounds. With the right preparation, you can be ready to sound like the competition, instead of a competitor.