Recruiters: New Boolean Sourcing Tool – Recruitin

I was recently told about a new tool – Recruitin.    I was told it let you X-ray LinkedIn, by creating the boolean for you, so I figured I would give it a try, last week.

First, make sure your web browser will allow pop-ups.  You will need this turned on to get the results.   After you are on the site, Recruitin, you just fill out the following tabs: 

  1. Country you want to Search.  Use the pull down menu to select the country.
  2. Job Title.  Enter in the job title you are looking for.  (also click the box for similar job titles.  This way if you are searching for a Project Manager you will also pull up PM and so on.)
  3. Fill out and list the location and key words. (Use a comma to separate the words.  For example:  Columbus, Ohio, OH, Engineer, PLC, automation, solidworks)
  4. Exclude words.   Do you have any words you do not want to search for, if so list them here, also separate by using a comma.   If you do not have any words to exclude you leave it blank.
  5. Degree.   Use the pull down menu to select a specific degree or leave it blank.
  6. Finally click the button – Find your people.

You will now notice a Boolean String at the top of the page.   This is an X-ray string that is using Google to X-ray and deep dive into LinkedIn.    You can either save the string or click on “open in Google”.  If you click on open in Google, a new window will pop up with your results.  You do not need to be connected to the people on LinkedIn to see the full names.    It doesn’t matter if you are a first connection, second connection, or connected at all.

I also suggest you save your strings, if you wish to reuse them.   You will see your saved strings on the right hand side of the screen.

Try it and play around with it.    Recruitin has its own user guide here, if you need more help.  I think it works pretty good.   If you do not like writing your own strings and need some help – this could be a useful tool for you to use.

 

 

Sourcing: More than a Good Boolean String

If I told you that there was an amazing and effective tool for sourcing, would you believe me? As a Sourcing Specialist, I look at resumes all day, every day. An effective sourcer knows that finding talented people is more than just punching in key skills and hoping for the database to spit out the perfect candidate. Sourcing requires in depth research, a finely crafted Boolean search string, and perseverance. But what many sourcing specialists miss is the fact that a resume is not the whole person.

One of my responsibilities is to present quality resumes to my team of recruiters. I could very easily punch in my search string on Monster or Career Builder, pull up the resumes, and forward them to the recruiter assigned to that particular position. But how exactly does that help my team? Our computers are used in all sorts of ways to research, find, and contact people that might be a fit for a particular role. But, as sourcers, we are neglecting the most important element of finding a great talented professional! Want to know what that is? Every desk has one, most people carry this tool in their pocket or purse, and millions of dollars are spent on advertising for it. Give up? It’s the telephone!

The role of a Sourcing Specialist is more than a resume pusher. A sourcer needs to investigate those resumes that stare back at them from their computer screens. The only way to do that is to speak with the candidate. By using the telephone, a sourcer can gather important information that is typically not listed on a resume. Is this candidate interviewing with other companies? What type of communication skills does this candidate have? Is this person willing to pursue this opportunity? Will this candidate travel or relocate? Can this person pass a background and drug screening? And better yet, is this person a good fit for the opportunity?

When we take the time to pick up the phone and speak with talented professionals, we are, in essence, being an advocate for both the candidate and the recruiter. The candidate feels valued and humanized and the recruiter is armed with important information to match this person with the best fitting opportunity. When we take the time to make a phone call, the resume becomes more than a piece of paper. That resume becomes a real person with real potential for new and exciting opportunities… and isn’t that why we do what we do?

Shannon Fatigante