Recruiters: New Boolean Sourcing Tool – Recruitin

I was recently told about a new tool – Recruitin.    I was told it let you X-ray LinkedIn, by creating the boolean for you, so I figured I would give it a try, last week.

First, make sure your web browser will allow pop-ups.  You will need this turned on to get the results.   After you are on the site, Recruitin, you just fill out the following tabs: 

  1. Country you want to Search.  Use the pull down menu to select the country.
  2. Job Title.  Enter in the job title you are looking for.  (also click the box for similar job titles.  This way if you are searching for a Project Manager you will also pull up PM and so on.)
  3. Fill out and list the location and key words. (Use a comma to separate the words.  For example:  Columbus, Ohio, OH, Engineer, PLC, automation, solidworks)
  4. Exclude words.   Do you have any words you do not want to search for, if so list them here, also separate by using a comma.   If you do not have any words to exclude you leave it blank.
  5. Degree.   Use the pull down menu to select a specific degree or leave it blank.
  6. Finally click the button – Find your people.

You will now notice a Boolean String at the top of the page.   This is an X-ray string that is using Google to X-ray and deep dive into LinkedIn.    You can either save the string or click on “open in Google”.  If you click on open in Google, a new window will pop up with your results.  You do not need to be connected to the people on LinkedIn to see the full names.    It doesn’t matter if you are a first connection, second connection, or connected at all.

I also suggest you save your strings, if you wish to reuse them.   You will see your saved strings on the right hand side of the screen.

Try it and play around with it.    Recruitin has its own user guide here, if you need more help.  I think it works pretty good.   If you do not like writing your own strings and need some help – this could be a useful tool for you to use.

 

 

Get started using Boolean Strings, on linkedin

Are you using boolean strings in your recruiting and sourcing?   Why Not!?   What a great way to find the professional you are looking for.   You save money because it’s FREE and you do not have to post the expensive job ads that produce tons of resumes of unqualified candidates.    Boolean Strings will help your search so you can get the results you are looking for.

This post will focus on searching LinkedIn and narrowing down your search.   There are three main search engines to use: Google, Yahoo and Bing.    I would suggest using all three of them.   Each search engine has a different indexing system and will produce some different responses.  

Next we want to start narrowing the Boolean String so that it only does a Deep Dive into LinkedIn.   We start with a site command.

 

  •                site:linkedin.com

 

If you notice there are no spaces so far in this command.   Next, let’s say you are looking for a Mechanical Engineer, with a BSME, to work in Columbus, OH and they must have PLC and Lean Manufacturing Experience.    Do you know what to write next?  Try this:

 

  •                site:linkedin.com “Mechanical Engineer” Columbus (OH OR Ohio) Lean PLC BSME

 

This is a good basic Boolean String.   If you notice above, you do not have to type the word AND anymore if you are searching for different criteria and multiple keywords.   A simple space in-between your keywords will work.   If you look at the string above it says, we are looking in LinkedIn only, for the phrase “Mechanical Engineer” who lives in Columbus OH (we added an OR so it will look for the abbr. OH or spelled out OHIO) and key words lean, BSME and PLC.  

Hope this helps – this is pretty basic so far.    You can play with it and see if you can narrow it down, if you want.    Try it and see.

 

Boolean Search Strings—Not as Scary as you Might Think!

The first step for sourcers and recruiters is to understand the job request sitting on their desk. Then they need to put together a finely crafted Boolean search string. When we receive a job requisition we now need to condense it in such a way as to bring back excellent resumes that match that job order. Sometimes this can be a bit daunting. As an IT sourcer, I need to be educated on what the job is really asking for. If any skill seems like a foreign fleck of abstract Martian language, chances are a little research is needed. Once an understanding of the job request is gained, the fun begins.

       Taking all of the information from a job description and condensing it into a few lines can be challenging. For example, if a job request is asking for a Senior Oracle Database Developer with skills in Oracle, pl/sql, stored procedures, and Oracle XML, a Boolean string could be constructed as follows:

“oracle database developer” AND oracle AND pl/sql AND “stored procedures” AND “oracle xml”

Now, not everyone writes their resumes with these skills the same way. The opportunity to miss out on a talented professional can happen if alternative spellings aren’t accounted for. So, the revised string could look like this:

(“oracle database developer” OR “database developer”) AND oracle AND (pl/sql OR plsql OR “pl sql” OR pl-sql) AND “stored procedures” AND (“oracle xml” OR xml)

When you put a phrase in quotes, you are telling the computer to bring back results with that exact phrase. If you need to create an OR option, put the options in parenthesis.

Now, our string is much more specific. The more specific the string, the fewer amount of results will be retrieved. Also, note that NOT can be used as well. If our job request specifies that they do not want resumes reflecting work in finance, then we could add that on like this:

(“oracle database developer” OR “database developer”) AND oracle AND (pl/sql OR plsql OR “pl sql” OR pl-sql) AND “stored procedures” AND (“oracle xml” OR xml) AND NOT (finance OR banking)

Sometimes Boolean strings can be too specific. Another strategy is to find alternative names for key skills and create an OR option in your string. Many people leave off skills on their resumes because those skills may be implied in a job title. Be flexible and allow for some loosening up of key words. Not everyone writes their resumes the same way. By allowing for variations on skills or action words, your search string can yield amazing results. Be flexible, have fun, and don’t be afraid to tweak your string!

Shannon Fatigante

 

Sourcing: More than a Good Boolean String

If I told you that there was an amazing and effective tool for sourcing, would you believe me? As a Sourcing Specialist, I look at resumes all day, every day. An effective sourcer knows that finding talented people is more than just punching in key skills and hoping for the database to spit out the perfect candidate. Sourcing requires in depth research, a finely crafted Boolean search string, and perseverance. But what many sourcing specialists miss is the fact that a resume is not the whole person.

One of my responsibilities is to present quality resumes to my team of recruiters. I could very easily punch in my search string on Monster or Career Builder, pull up the resumes, and forward them to the recruiter assigned to that particular position. But how exactly does that help my team? Our computers are used in all sorts of ways to research, find, and contact people that might be a fit for a particular role. But, as sourcers, we are neglecting the most important element of finding a great talented professional! Want to know what that is? Every desk has one, most people carry this tool in their pocket or purse, and millions of dollars are spent on advertising for it. Give up? It’s the telephone!

The role of a Sourcing Specialist is more than a resume pusher. A sourcer needs to investigate those resumes that stare back at them from their computer screens. The only way to do that is to speak with the candidate. By using the telephone, a sourcer can gather important information that is typically not listed on a resume. Is this candidate interviewing with other companies? What type of communication skills does this candidate have? Is this person willing to pursue this opportunity? Will this candidate travel or relocate? Can this person pass a background and drug screening? And better yet, is this person a good fit for the opportunity?

When we take the time to pick up the phone and speak with talented professionals, we are, in essence, being an advocate for both the candidate and the recruiter. The candidate feels valued and humanized and the recruiter is armed with important information to match this person with the best fitting opportunity. When we take the time to make a phone call, the resume becomes more than a piece of paper. That resume becomes a real person with real potential for new and exciting opportunities… and isn’t that why we do what we do?

Shannon Fatigante