Fear of the Invisible

In all my experience with preparing candidates for interviews, the hardest interviews that people have are with phone interviews. And understandably so – phone interviews are a lot harder than the face-to-face interview. Not only are you dealing entirely with verbal cues as to the interviewer’s interest, but you are also on the self-timer when it comes to answers. Go too long, and you’ve lost the interest of the person on the other end of the line. Go too short, and you can be interpreted as lacking experience and credibility for the job you are interviewing for.

You know the saying “an ounce of preparation is worth a pound of cure?” Nothing could apply more directly for the phone interview. Preparation is the key to getting to the next step in the hiring process, and being passed over by the recruiter for the next candidate.

First, start by doing your research on the company and the position. What are they looking for? What deficits does the company have that you can immediately fill with your skills and experience? How do you fix their problem, and fill in the needs of the company?

Next, research the individual you will be interviewing with. Put their name in on Google and see what comes up. Check out their LinkedIn account to view their background. If you can draw parallels with them and find common ground by which you can both work, your conversation will go that much easier on interview day.

Finally, prepare your answers to the interview. Brevity is key on this one: Don’t go so long that you lose their attention, but don’t give too little detail that you don’t answer the question. Try to have your answers prepared for thirty seconds or less. If you have more to share, you can always ask if they want you to continue, or if you have answered their question.

The phone interview does not have to be as intimidating as it sounds. With the right preparation, you can be ready to sound like the competition, instead of a competitor.

Don’t be scared to speak up.

I know there are a lot of people out there that have had at least one, if not multiple bad experiences with a recruiter. Heck, I have and I am one. (Not you Bruce Rowles. You are the best!) So, I understand if you get another call (probably your 3rd of the day if you’re a Java Developer) and you aren’t overly optimistic. But, if you do decide to spend time on the phone with one, and agree to being submitted to a job, keep in touch.

Now, I realize this is a 2-way street and that there has been a time or 2 in the past where you never heard back from your recruiter. But, there are some of us out there that actually enjoy helping people get jobs. We like calling you with updates about your interview times and preparing you with tips on what works in an interview.

We take pride in helping you re-arrange your resume’s format to make it “pop”. Enjoy telling you how to best learn about the company and person you’re meeting with and providing you with details about the job/company Monster’s hyperlink to HR fails to give you. These are some of the benefits of working with a top-notch recruiter.

So, with that being said, why would you entertain the initial phone call, talk about your job history, goals and desires, ask to be submitted for a job, dress up pretty for an interview, accept the job offered, take a drug test, get fingerprinted for the background check, fill out paperwork and then NOT show up for your first day?!?

No longer are you answering the phone when I call. You have decided to not respond to emails. Text message are no longer reaching you. You have officially disappeared from planet Earth. But why? Magic? Probably not.

More likely is that something just wasn’t quite right for you. You had a bad feeling in your gut. “Instinct”. We all get those feelings and it’s completely normal. What you DON’T want to do is ignore that recruiter who helped you get the job. Who taught you about interviewing and provided insight into processes and procedures that increased your interviewing effectiveness and led to an eventual job offer.

Don’t be scared to speak up regarding ANYTHING! Good recruiters are like agents. We represent you the way you want to be represented. If you have a question, just ask. If it’s not an answer you want, that’s okay. Now I know exactly what you want/think/feel so the next time we work together, the job I present you with will be more in-line with what you want and you are happy as a pig in…..

Trust a recruiter – we can help make your interview count…

Part of my Job is to prepare you for the interview.   This includes Interview Prep and Debrief afterwards.   I understand that candidates do not interview every day – I do.    If you were just laid off from your job, after 15 years, that could mean, you have not interviewed in 15 years.   A lot has changed since then and you need to be prepared for your interview.  I can give you some helpful tips and suggestions that hopefully will help you get a second interview or better yet – the job.   

 

Interview Prep.:

Before the interview you will have all the info. you will need to be successful.  You will have the complete job description, details on the job/company and my experiences working with them, as a recruiter.   I will ask you to do your own research on them and on the Hiring Managers.  We will then discuss what you found.    

We will discuss the questions you still have and how to ask them, along with asking some great follow-up questions at the end of the interview.   We will discuss how to answer salary questions, goal related questions and how to end the interview.

My goal is to make the interview as painless as possible and hopefully you were prepared and there were no surprises.   I will let you know what to expect from me, as your recruiter and what I expect from you, as my candidate.  

 

Interview Debrief:

After the interview, you should call me as soon as possible, while it is still fresh in your mind.    I am going to ask you 100 questions about the interview.   Questions like:  What time did you arrive?   How long were you in the interview?   With whom did you meet?   What questions did they ask?  How did you answer?   and so on…   I need to understand how the interview went and what was the vibe.   

The most important question I will ask following your interview is:  “Is this still a position you are interested in and if it meets your salary requirements, would you accept?”   I am looking for a YES or NO answer.   Anything else usually means it is not the right fit for you – for what ever reason.

We are a partner in this process and need to work as partners.   I have worked hard in sourcing, finding and recruiting you for the opportunity.   I will not let a bad interview stop me in getting you the job you want, need and dreamed of.