Everything is an Interview…

Are you looking for a job?    Did you send your resume in to a potential employer?   Keep one thing in mind – Everything you do and every conversation you have – IS AN INTERVIEW.  Whether you are talking to the Manager, to Human Resources or to the Front Desk Receptionist, Everything is an interview.     

  1. Do not have a weird font or graphics on your resume
  2. Do not have an unprofessional voicemail
  3. Do not have an unprofessional email id
  4. When meeting someone for coffee to network, dress professional and pay for the coffee
  5. Be prepared – expect that person calling you to be an Hiring Manager
  6. Respect and professionalism
  7. Social Media – keep it professional.    Companies will search your social media, be prepared and delete the party pictures from college.

When being interviewed or considered for a job, you are under a microscope.   A lot of times the companies will look for a reason not to hire you instead of reasons to hire you.    Do not give them a reason.   The little things you do, do matter:   Hold the door open when walking into a room or building, have good eye contact when speaking, have a firm hand shake, sit-up in your chair and speak slowly and clearly and thank them for their time and consideration.

Your resume will get you in the door but how you portray yourself will get you the job.

Do not put all your eggs in one basket…

Dear Job Seeker,

I am glad that we have started to work together, in your job search.    As a Recruiter, who partnered with you, I will do my best to help you land that NEW opportunity you are looking for.    We will talk and get to know each other, to find the best job and best fit for you and the Company.   My goal is your goal = Getting you the new job and for you to start your new career.

But what else are you doing?   Are you still looking on your own?   Are you still networking?   Are you still doing the things you need to do to find that job?   Did you update your LinkedIn profile and are you using social media?  Are you talking with other recruiters?   Do not put all your eggs in one basket.

I would love to be the one who can help you but the fact is – I can not help everyone, in their time of need.    I may not have a job opening you are a match for, at that time.  Not everyone is a fit for every job and not every job is a fit for everyone.   You need to do what is best for you – keep networking, keep participating on social media, keep applying, keep working with Recruiters and keep doing the tasks you need to do.    If I can help you in your job search or give you helpful tips, I will.     If you get that new job you have been looking for, through another venue, CONGRATS!   As a recruiter, I am not here to hurt your job search but to help and compliment it.   

In short, there are many tasks you need to do, when looking for a new job.  Do Not Put Your Eggs in One Basket, do all of the tasks you need to do, to reach your goal:  A New Job.

The Job Search: A Covert Operation

So you’ve landed the interview – great job! You go into the interview prepared, get great feedback from the people you interview with, and are feeling like you’ve got this deal signed and delivered. So, naturally, the first thing you want to do is tell the world whose checks you will soon be cashing.

Let’s take two steps back here and consider a couple things. First off, you don’t have the job until you get a formal offer; a title and job description, salary, and start date. So as long as those things have not been delivered, you don’t have a job. Translation: You’re probably not the only candidate they will have discussions with.

Which brings me to my second point: If the company you just interviewed with is still talking to other people, why do you want to advertise that to the entire world? People in your immediate circle – whether they be friends, golf buddies, or people you are connected on Facebook with – may also be looking for a job like the one you want. And if they know the company you just talked to will hire, your odds of getting the job just got wider.

When going through the job search and interview process, think of it as a secret mission. The information you are guarding is who you’re talking to, what you’re talking to them about, and the timeline they’ve got you on. By keeping this information close, you have more control over the hiring process, and are able to better secure your odds as being the chosen candidate when its time to make a decision to hire.

Social Networking’s Guide to Finding Employment

Social MediaWith the unemployment rates at an all time high, it is essential, now more than ever, to tap into alternative ways of getting noticed—and getting hired. Recruiters and Talent Acquisition Specialists have relied mainly on the job boards for their pool of resumes. Sites like CareerBuilder.com, Monster.com, Dice.com, and many others are over-flowing with resumes from every industry and educational level. With such a large pool of competition, how can anyone become noticed?

Many recruiters rely on a well-crafted Boolean search string and wait for the website to spit out a handful of resumes that match their job description. But this method can only give recruiters a list of skills, completely overlooking the essence of who these job seekers really are. Most job seekers do not understand the processes recruiters use to find talented professionals, and as a result, become overlooked. The use of social networking creates a new layer for job seekers. The power of sites like LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter are drawing attention. There are millions of users on these sites. This is no longer a want-ad kind of world—this is a world of cut throat competition based on who you know and who you impress. Social networking can bridge the gap between a nameless resume to a memorable meeting with executives and recruiters ready to put you to work.

LinkedIn is a networking site geared toward professionals. This site has over 135 million members with the majority over the age of 25 making an annual income in the six figure range. LinkedIn members are serious about their professions by linking up with other professionals in and out of their industries. LinkedIn members conduct themselves in a more professional matter than members of Facebook which is geared more towards casual contact. LinkedIn also comes up in the top 5% of all Google.com searches. It is a key site to present your best professional face to the working world. Connecting with co-workers and friends on LinkedIn is appropriate; however, the key is to not limit yourself to those you know. By expanding your LinkedIn connections, there are more opportunities to network with professionals working in companies you might be interested in. Also, joining LinkedIn groups can give you an inside view of company news.

LinkedIn is not the only social networking site that can help land jobs. Facebook and Twitter also have a huge web presence. Many potential employers scan your Twitter feeds and Facebook posts in an effort to get to know you. Updating your statuses to reflect that you are job hunting will get attention. People are more than resumes and companies recognize that. In fact, recently a company posted an advertisement for an investment analyst but instead of receiving traditional resumes, job seekers were asked to provide their LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook links along with a video message as to why these candidates wanted this job. They are most interested in what people are like, what they are like to work with, how they think. By utilizing social media, hiring companies can get a better feel for potential hires and avoid the jungle of faceless resumes.

If you are still not convinced that social media can help you land a job, try these statistics on for size. For every six people, one gets hired using social media. Over half of job seekers use LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter to find jobs. When polled 18,400,000 people say that Facebook got them a job, 8,000,000 give Twitter credit for their jobs, and 10,200,000 people credit LinkedIn with their current positions. And remember, the average LinkedIn user makes over $100,000 in annual income. Do I have your attention?

So, how exactly do sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn help you network and land a great job? First, it is common knowledge that having an inside contact is incredibly beneficial for finding a great job. That’s how I got my current job, but not everyone has a second cousin or friend of a friend that can give inside information or push your resume to the top of the stack. This is where savvy networking can educate you and bring attention to your profile with the big bosses. For instance, searching LinkedIn for company employees can bring you to the person that might end up interviewing you. This is the time to send a private message to connect—only. Pushing your resume during this first contact is ineffective and will most likely get you nowhere. Begin by asking questions about his or her job and develop a relationship. Your contact will be more likely to endorse you if you begin this way—trust me. Also, use groups to connect with people. You will most likely link up with someone in the same group verses going straight for the HR person who will delete your Inmail. And don’t stop there, find out about the person doing the interviewing. Pointing out commonalities goes a long way in relationship building and elbow rubbing.

Using social media has its advantages for getting you noticed. Millions of members take part in professional websites. It is a bridge that fills the gap between an anonymous resume and your professional presence. Recruiters and hiring managers alike troll these sites for potential hires. Introduce yourself and you will get that virtual handshake—that’s a promise.

On a Contract? Everyday is an Interview…

Are you on a contract or interested in one?    I have one phrase of advice for you…. Everyday is an Interview.

There is no secret that a contract job is a great way to get hired on direct and to land that full-time job.   There are many reasons you may be a contractor:

  • cover a medical or maternity leave
  • cover for someone who is working on other projects
  • to work on special projects
  • they are behind and need some extra support
  • for a Temp-to-Hire.

Whatever the reason you are in there and contracting – this is your chance.   Show them they don’t want to let you go.   You need to out work and out perform the others there.    Live by the motto – Everyday is an Interview.   You never know what is going to happen.    What if the person doesn’t come back from the leave, now they have an opening?   What if after you start a full-time employee gives their notice?   You just never know when a scenario will open up and you are now being considered for the job.

Also remember, hiring managers usually know other managers.    Maybe the contract is over but they recommend you to another manager and department.     It is important for you to keep your A-Game and again – Everyday is an Interview!

I have had many, many, many contractors hired from a contract job.    It happens all the time and has already happened twice this month.  I also have had many passed over and other contractors were hired and given the opportunity.  Mainly because they failed to live by the motto.

 

The Job Search Marathon

One of the biggest misconceptions by candidates that I’ve seen in my years as a job search coach is that they do not view the job search process as a competition. Many of the candidates that come to me for the first time are content to send out their resumes, and wait for a response.

What they don’t realize is that they are not the only one putting out their resumes for those same positions. According to CareerBuilder.com, for every one position a company opens, an employer will receive, on average, 75 resumes. With all that paper, not to mention the contacts and keywords to swim through, it is very easy for a potential hire’s information to get lost in that shuffle.

Job search is absolutely a competition! One of the quickest ways a candidate can jump from being a resume to being a hire is by being proactive in a job search. Think of it as a marathon: everyone starts at the starting line; the point where you consider applying for the job. One the shot fires, everyone starts. And, ultimately, there can be only one winner.

What makes the difference between the candidate who finishes first and the one who finishes in the middle of the pack? How they train for the marathon is a big step: you can’t go straight from the couch to the marathon. Why would one try the same for a job search? Further, think of what a marathon runner goes through when training: their diet changes, and their exercise routine gets more focused. So should a job seeker make similar changes to how their resume plays to the needs of the employer, and focus on how to get connected to the companies they want to be at.

By looking at the job search like a competition, a candidate can easily go from being glazed over to being a star candidate. And that perspective adjustment can mean the difference between accepting the job one wants, and merely accepting a job.

11 Reasons the grass is not always greener…

Have you ever heard the saying – “The grass is not always greener”?   Basically I think this means – look at what you have before you jump into something new.

Are you looking for a new job or career path?   Before you start searching, you should first ask yourself:  What do you currently have?  What are some tangible and intangible reasons on what is positive about your current job?    What are some items that might not be available at your new job?  If you want to leave for more money, my advice is:  Salary should not be the only item.

 

11 Positive Items about your current job to consider (no specific order):

  1. Do you have cheaper insurance premiums?
  2. Current location is closer to home?
  3. Flexibility in hours?
  4. A good 401k match and retirement plan?
  5. Good working relationship with your co-workers and/or boss?
  6. Promotion and career opportunities?
  7. Do you love what you’re doing?
  8. Company outings and trips?
  9. Bonuses/profit-sharing?
  10. Do you have tenure?
  11. Does your job offer you the ability to sustain a good quality of life?

If you are truly unhappy and want to find another job – Good luck and I wish you the best in your career.   If I can help you, as a recruiter, find your Dream Job then I want to do that.  I enjoy helping candidates find their next job and career. 

Please consider the grass and where you are standing before you start your search.   Do not waste the company’s time, your time or mine – if you have not thought it through.    Also if you do get another offer – now you get to think about the “Counter-Offer.”